Where is Everyone Going?

 Posted by on November 29, 2011
Nov 292011
 

37.5 million Americans moved during 2010.  4.3 million changed states.

Find out where your neighbors went and who took their place…

(click for interactive map)

For contrast to Brooklyn’s traffic, check out some rural counties.

[Migration Map from Forbes]
[Related: To and Fro, Internationally]

You Can’t Handle the Cover

 Posted by on November 28, 2011
Nov 282011
 

Time is running a new contest:  Speculate on their choice to run a different December 5th cover in the U.S.

The winner gets nothing.

Ape Con Myth’s entry will use phrases like “New World vs. Old World” and sum things up with something like “that cover will probably sell better in the U.S.”

Feel free to leave your own entries in the comments and we’ll pass them along.  First person to mention Occupy Wall Street also wins nothing.

[Time covers via @suckapants]

Is “Buy Nothing” the Wrong Idea Now?

 Posted by on November 25, 2011
Nov 252011
 

An idea is better than no idea. In the face of run-away consumerism, perhaps the first step is slamming on the brakes.  It won’t stop the train, but it could provide a much needed jolt.

Or you can wait for it to hit a wall, which always gets people’s attention.

That’s where we are now. But during tough times, over-consumption isn’t our problem. Remaining consumers, in the most basic sense, is the challenge now.

We need a new approach to spending. Looking at the current state of American economics and politics, the key could be a realization.

Spending is the new voting.

There’s not a corporation on Earth that can survive without customers. They exist purely on our whim. Support the ones you want to see thrive. Better yet, support the ones that want to see you thrive.

It isn’t easy. Convenience is making a lot of decisions these days. Who has the time to do more? If today could be used for anything, perhaps it should be to inconvenience ourselves. Rather than buy nothing, we could go out of our way to consider our spending more thoughtfully. To think about the businesses we default to and take the time to find alternatives to those we’d rather not be supporting.

We can call it Inconvenience Day. And unlike Buy Nothing Day, everyone camping out for Black Friday sales can say they participated too.

A Map of Where to Give Thanks

 Posted by on November 23, 2011
Nov 232011
 

During hard times, being thankful for what we have comes a little easier.  Here’s a map to help guide your thoughts of thanks in regards to food.

But before you breath a sign of relief over there being so much room to grow more, remember that only 29% of the Earth’s surface is land and only 9% of it is arable.  And guess what, we’re not taking good care of it.

We have much to be thankful for, but it’s not a guaranteed condition.  They’ll still call it Thanksgiving, even if there’s hardly anything on your plate.  Just ask anyone with hardly anything on their plate.

[Map 1 from Radical Cartography, Map 2 from The Global Education Project]

Dragged to the Back of the Pack

 Posted by on November 21, 2011
Nov 212011
 

Every once in a while you have to reassess the things you are proud of.  Is the quality that first inspired you still important?  Is it still there?

Does the idea of America in your mind include the Czech Republic possessing a vastly superior ability to keep its citizens above the poverty line?

Is being below-average part of the plan?

(click for the full-sized version)

The way our government operates, you’d assume it represents a nation of people only interested in corporate profits.  As if our drive as a nation were to put money over every other concern, from the quality of products and services to the quality of life itself.

If the economy can not remain stable, if a person can not create a livelihood within the economy, the economy can not be called dependable.  It becomes a risk that must be hedged.  The government represents the people’s hedge.

If big business can not deliver, they should lose the competition, not be allowed to rewrite the rules so they still win.  If they don’t want to compete, they are unfit to lead and endanger us with their attempts to manipulate our government.

They can go to the back of the pack if they want, but should not be allowed to take our country with them.  We’re better than that.

This isn’t Corporate America.  This is the United States of America.  We’re the boss here.

[Infographic from GOOD Magazine]

Nov 162011
 

This one is pretty simple.  If you like the internet, whether it be Facebook, Ape Con Myth or anything in-between, you’ve got a little work to do.  Today, Congress begins hearings on PROTECT-IP, a bill that will allow for widespread and systematic censorship of the internet.  And today, the internet is fighting back.

Fight for the Future sums up the situation here:

The word is Congress might try to push this through by the end of the month.  There is no time to waste if you have any interest in wasting more time on the internet in the future.  Write your representatives, sign a petition, and if you’ve got the time and gumption, call your representatives to follow up.

This is not a joke.  This is not a drill.  If you’re getting tired of having to do this kind of stuff, let your representative know that too.